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mythomania: what’s it about?

Ian Kirkpatrick’s Mythomania exhibition explores our timeless fascination for mythical stories.

We spoke with Ian about the exhibition and why it’s a must-see:

In your own words, what’s the exhibition about?

The exhibition is inspired ultimately by mythology. I’ve always had an interest in the ancient past, particularly historical forms like monuments, totems, that sort of thing.

Mythomania uses these to explore stories we tell about ourselves in the modern world – whether it’s America the Great, Great Britain – all the kind of things that may have been founded in truth, but things that we expand into a kind of mythology about ourselves.

So you have a piece which looks like something quite ancient, such as Anubis from Egyptian mythology, but obviously done in a really modern way with an almost Louis Vuitton-inspired surface pattern. I like that kind of instant juxtaposition.

What will people enjoy about the exhibition?

The first thing that children in particular will spot are the colours. They draw your eye and make you want to look at the pieces.

Of course the difference is the messaging on the surface is more complex and layered, so hopefully visitors will enjoy looking into the deeper meaning and social critique of the pieces that children won’t notice.

People will also love the shapes and the scale of the pieces. They look a bit robotic, almost like Transformers! A lot of my pieces have a toy-like element to them, even if they have a serious message behind them.

What would you say to someone who’s thinking of visiting Mythomania?

People don’t often realise just how big the artworks are. Sometimes people see the photos and think the artworks are quite small, but actually many of them are really big.

You can walk around the pieces, look at all the hidden messages embedded in the surfaces, and even play games trying to figure out things you can spot which you might recognise. In some way you can almost turn it into a game!

Mythomania is now open in The Point’s gallery. Find out more and plan your visit.

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